"I’m one of those people that you have to keep your eye on or I’ll wander off into the woods and forget to come back."
— Jack White (via alternatedimension)

(Source: thechocolatebrigade)

My current mood

(Source: mtvother)

newsweek:

BBC News - Why Finnish babies sleep in cardboard boxes

For 75 years, Finland’s expectant mothers have been given a box by the state. It’s like a starter kit of clothes, sheets and toys that can even be used as a bed. And some say it helped Finland achieve one of the world’s lowest infant mortality rates.

coolchicksfromhistory:

The 14th Century Women of Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella, and Mercuriade
Art by Tiny Tarakeet (tumblr)
Schola Medica Salernitana was the most important medical school in medieval Europe.  Located in the southern Italian city of Salerno, the school served as a cultural crossroads, integrating Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Arabic teachings.  Professors at Schola Medica Salernitana produced translations, treatises, and reference books that influenced physicians and medical schools across Europe for centuries. 
Many women are known to have studied or taught at Schola Medica Salernitana between 1000 and 1500 CE.  The most famous is the 12th century physician Trota.  The archives of Naples include numerous medical licenses granted to women without any apparent restrictions, although some mention that women are particularly suited to gynecology and obstetrics.  The entire department of women’s diseases at Schola Medica Salernitana was run by female physicians.  
Pictured above are three 14th century female physicians associated with Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella and Mercuriade.  Rebecca de Guarna was a physician and surgeon native to Salerno who wrote treatises on fevers, urine, and embryology.  Abella (also known as Abella of Castellomata or Abella of Salerno) was a Roman physician who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She produced academic works on black bile and seminal fluid  Mercuriade was a physician and surgeon who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She also published treatises on fevers and wounds.
By the end of the 14th century the medical school at Salerno had fallen from favor as schools in Naples, Bologna, and Montpelier rose in prominence. Today, Schola Medica Salernitana is a museum.  

coolchicksfromhistory:

The 14th Century Women of Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella, and Mercuriade

Art by Tiny Tarakeet (tumblr)

Schola Medica Salernitana was the most important medical school in medieval Europe.  Located in the southern Italian city of Salerno, the school served as a cultural crossroads, integrating Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Arabic teachings.  Professors at Schola Medica Salernitana produced translations, treatises, and reference books that influenced physicians and medical schools across Europe for centuries. 

Many women are known to have studied or taught at Schola Medica Salernitana between 1000 and 1500 CE.  The most famous is the 12th century physician Trota.  The archives of Naples include numerous medical licenses granted to women without any apparent restrictions, although some mention that women are particularly suited to gynecology and obstetrics.  The entire department of women’s diseases at Schola Medica Salernitana was run by female physicians.  

Pictured above are three 14th century female physicians associated with Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella and Mercuriade.  Rebecca de Guarna was a physician and surgeon native to Salerno who wrote treatises on fevers, urine, and embryology.  Abella (also known as Abella of Castellomata or Abella of Salerno) was a Roman physician who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She produced academic works on black bile and seminal fluid  Mercuriade was a physician and surgeon who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She also published treatises on fevers and wounds.

By the end of the 14th century the medical school at Salerno had fallen from favor as schools in Naples, Bologna, and Montpelier rose in prominence. Today, Schola Medica Salernitana is a museum.  

I believe it was Rodney King (1965-2012) who once said, “Can we all get along?”

meavssea:

mineralists:

Green Amber (fossilized tree resin from an ancient relative of a tropical species called “algarroba”) from Dominican Republic

Beauty!

evangotlib:

sadgirldiscotheque:

leseanthomas:

"This is what the next generation of engineers looks like

Black Girls CODE introduces young girls of color to computer programming, mobile app development, robotics and other STEM fields, so the girls can learn how to build the tools they want to see in the world. The non-profit is a global organization, with chapters in Oakland, Calif., Atlanta, New York and even South Africa, with expansion to eight more cities planned for next year. Every chapter targets girls of color between the ages of 7 and 17, formative years for capturing the girls’ interest in STEM and building their self-confidence.

"Science is magic, and our girls are opening their eyes to the fact that they can learn to become the magicians," says Bryant, who launched the company with a class of 12 girls.

But the reach of Black Girls CODE has grown exponentially in two years; the roster now exceeds 2,000 girls. Bryant was named one of the White House’s Champions for Change in the tech sector, and Black Girls Code was named one the “2012 Most Innovative Nonprofit.”

Source: http://mmxlii.com/this-is-what-the-next-generation-of-engineers-looks-like/

Awesome.