"I am very poorly today and very stupid and hate everybody and everything."

comedycentral:

Click here to watch Larry Wilmore and Jon Stewart discuss shop and frisk on The Daily Show.

Full episodes are available anytime, anywhere on the Comedy Central app.

"The government pays twice for obesity: first for the corn subsidy (to make high-fructose corn syrup), and then for emergency room heart attacks and health care."
— UCSF’s Robert Lustig talking about how the United States needs to shift its policy on regulating sugar content in foods. (via ucresearch)

npr:

Musical training doesn’t just improve your ear for music, it also helps your ear for speech. That’s the takeaway from an unusual new study published in The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers found that kids who took music lessons for two years didn’t just get better at playing the trombone or violin. They found that playing music also helped kids’ brains process language.

This Is Your Brain. This Is Your Brain On Music

Photo credit: Annie Tritt for NPR

"I’m one of those people that you have to keep your eye on or I’ll wander off into the woods and forget to come back."
— Jack White (via alternatedimension)

(Source: thechocolatebrigade)

My current mood

(Source: mtvother)

newsweek:

BBC News - Why Finnish babies sleep in cardboard boxes

For 75 years, Finland’s expectant mothers have been given a box by the state. It’s like a starter kit of clothes, sheets and toys that can even be used as a bed. And some say it helped Finland achieve one of the world’s lowest infant mortality rates.

coolchicksfromhistory:

The 14th Century Women of Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella, and Mercuriade
Art by Tiny Tarakeet (tumblr)
Schola Medica Salernitana was the most important medical school in medieval Europe.  Located in the southern Italian city of Salerno, the school served as a cultural crossroads, integrating Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Arabic teachings.  Professors at Schola Medica Salernitana produced translations, treatises, and reference books that influenced physicians and medical schools across Europe for centuries. 
Many women are known to have studied or taught at Schola Medica Salernitana between 1000 and 1500 CE.  The most famous is the 12th century physician Trota.  The archives of Naples include numerous medical licenses granted to women without any apparent restrictions, although some mention that women are particularly suited to gynecology and obstetrics.  The entire department of women’s diseases at Schola Medica Salernitana was run by female physicians.  
Pictured above are three 14th century female physicians associated with Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella and Mercuriade.  Rebecca de Guarna was a physician and surgeon native to Salerno who wrote treatises on fevers, urine, and embryology.  Abella (also known as Abella of Castellomata or Abella of Salerno) was a Roman physician who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She produced academic works on black bile and seminal fluid  Mercuriade was a physician and surgeon who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She also published treatises on fevers and wounds.
By the end of the 14th century the medical school at Salerno had fallen from favor as schools in Naples, Bologna, and Montpelier rose in prominence. Today, Schola Medica Salernitana is a museum.  

coolchicksfromhistory:

The 14th Century Women of Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella, and Mercuriade

Art by Tiny Tarakeet (tumblr)

Schola Medica Salernitana was the most important medical school in medieval Europe.  Located in the southern Italian city of Salerno, the school served as a cultural crossroads, integrating Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Arabic teachings.  Professors at Schola Medica Salernitana produced translations, treatises, and reference books that influenced physicians and medical schools across Europe for centuries. 

Many women are known to have studied or taught at Schola Medica Salernitana between 1000 and 1500 CE.  The most famous is the 12th century physician Trota.  The archives of Naples include numerous medical licenses granted to women without any apparent restrictions, although some mention that women are particularly suited to gynecology and obstetrics.  The entire department of women’s diseases at Schola Medica Salernitana was run by female physicians.  

Pictured above are three 14th century female physicians associated with Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella and Mercuriade.  Rebecca de Guarna was a physician and surgeon native to Salerno who wrote treatises on fevers, urine, and embryology.  Abella (also known as Abella of Castellomata or Abella of Salerno) was a Roman physician who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She produced academic works on black bile and seminal fluid  Mercuriade was a physician and surgeon who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She also published treatises on fevers and wounds.

By the end of the 14th century the medical school at Salerno had fallen from favor as schools in Naples, Bologna, and Montpelier rose in prominence. Today, Schola Medica Salernitana is a museum.