meavssea:

mineralists:

Green Amber (fossilized tree resin from an ancient relative of a tropical species called “algarroba”) from Dominican Republic

Beauty!

evangotlib:

sadgirldiscotheque:

leseanthomas:

"This is what the next generation of engineers looks like

Black Girls CODE introduces young girls of color to computer programming, mobile app development, robotics and other STEM fields, so the girls can learn how to build the tools they want to see in the world. The non-profit is a global organization, with chapters in Oakland, Calif., Atlanta, New York and even South Africa, with expansion to eight more cities planned for next year. Every chapter targets girls of color between the ages of 7 and 17, formative years for capturing the girls’ interest in STEM and building their self-confidence.

"Science is magic, and our girls are opening their eyes to the fact that they can learn to become the magicians," says Bryant, who launched the company with a class of 12 girls.

But the reach of Black Girls CODE has grown exponentially in two years; the roster now exceeds 2,000 girls. Bryant was named one of the White House’s Champions for Change in the tech sector, and Black Girls Code was named one the “2012 Most Innovative Nonprofit.”

Source: http://mmxlii.com/this-is-what-the-next-generation-of-engineers-looks-like/

Awesome.  

"

Black people have been present in Britain since its early history. A troop stationed at Hadrian’s Wall in the third century AD was reported to include black soldiers and, in medieval times, black musicians were a common feature of Britain’s courts. In the 18th century Britain’s increasing mastery of transatlantic trade, particularly its dominant role in the trade in enslaved Africans, brought about a significant increase in its black population. By 1770 this population is estimated to have numbered around 15,000 people, based largely in London and around ports involved in transatlantic trade such as Bristol and Liverpool.

Black Britons worked in a variety of professions; as sailors, shopkeepers, artisans, labourers, peddlers and street musicians, amongst others. The biggest employment sector for both white and black populations was domestic service and a large number of black people worked as servants, butlers, valets and other domestic helps. Unlike their white counterparts it is probable that black domestic workers were largely unpaid and unable to voluntarily leave their employer. The social and legal position of black people in Britain remained precarious throughout the 18th century and, as Norma Myers has noted, ‘as late as 1785 black people continued to be regarded and indeed, treated as property’.

Some Africans were able to resist the anonymity and oppression of domestic service and attain a profile for themselves. Examples include Francis Barber (ca. 1735-1801), the Jamaican-born valet, secretary and later heir of Samuel Johnson, also Ignatius Sancho (1729-1780), born on a ship transporting slaves from Africa to the West Indies, butler to the Montagu family, later owner of a Westminster grocery shop and best-selling author of a collection of letters, published in 1782. The records of other African lives marked by slavery have been lost to us but are likely to be as varied as a racist society permitted.

Despite the diversity of black people in Britain and the occupations they held, in the visual culture of the period they appear most frequently in the role of domestic servant. The black servant is typically depicted as a boy or young man wearing a form of orientalised dress (or, at the very least, a feathered turban) in an affluent urban domestic environment. He is rarely pictured at the centre of the scene, which is usually dominated by white subjects, but is generally positioned at its margins. He is often associated with new commodities made available through transatlantic trade, such as tobacco, coffee, chocolate or tea (drunk with sugar from West Indies plantations).

"

-Silver Service Slavery: The Black Presence in the White Home

An analysis of 18th century images of Black Britons as (indentured and not) servants in art history in the 18th Century from the Victoria and Albert Museum. I like that it stresses the fact that the images of Black people as marginal figures don’t reflect the actual diversity in the lives of real people in that area during that time.

(via medievalpoc)

kenobi-wan-obi:

sancophaleague:

Darren Baptiste is a Professional App Developer from Canada and recently he decided to help bring awareness to the very serious issue of Police Brutality. The relationship between the police and the Black Community has never been good. The Police enforce laws of a system that aids the agenda of White supremacy and a country founded on racism and murder. 

Darren has experienced countless cases of Police Brutality in his lifetime and ever since the emergence of the internet anyone can see the atrocious cases of brutality on YouTube. Darren is wise enough to know that the Police cause a lot of the issues and use their badge, gun and law as protection when they brutalize people in the Black Community. A Black Person’s word means nothing against a Cops word in court.
The “Cop Watch” app begins shooting automatically once it’s opened, and as soon as recording is stopped, instantly uploads to YouTube. At the same time, an email is sent to a community-based Network for the Elimination of Police Violence , with the videographer’s location and a URL for the video. This app provides evidence in the favor of our people to help combat a serious issue. Baptiste designed the app to feature the “Eye of Horus” as a symbol of protection. Salute to Darren for taking a stand against Police Brutality.
Written By: @Champion_Us

This is amazing!

hey guys.. im here

"Nazi eugenicists frequently observed that their laws to bar Jewish-Aryan mating were more liberal than were American laws to separate people of African descent from the white genetic pool. Germans held that a person who was one-quarter Jewish was a legal Aryan and thus fit to marry a German, but parallel marriages and mating between whites and Black people were illegal in much of the United States and, in effect, punishable by death — lynching. The “one-drop” laws of many southern states counted anyone who had even one thirty-second African heritage as Black. Other laws, such as the 1924 Virginia Racial Integrity Act, denominated anyone with any “Negro blood” at all as Black. Editors of German medical journals learned a great deal about eugenic proscription by studying American medical journals, whose charts precisely detailed which racial mixtures were tolerable in marriages to whites, who was “white” enough to vote, and so on. In fact, a cordial rivalry characterized the relationship between German and American eugenicists: “The Germans are beating us at our own game,” Virginian eugenicist Dr. Joseph S. Dejarnette sighed in a thinly veiled admiration during a 1934 speech in which he urged the Virginia legislature to expand its sterilization laws."

Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present by Harriet A. Washington

Americans were so good at medicalized racism that the Nazis learned from us.

(via feministsupernatural)

For that underside of history that’s constantly swept over… Your institutions were likely built on this, and it’s something no one should forget.

(via scinerds)

(Source: callingoutbigotry)

theurbanfoxwatcher:

Red Foxes Across The World
Red foxes are the most successful carnivores on earth, and have managed to colonize most of the worlds continents. From arctic tundra to deserts, mountains to urban streets, the red fox is able to adapt to live in any conditions, and it’s this, along with their adaptable diet and high intelligence, is what makes them so successful.
Because of the range of environments they inhabit, their size, anatomy and appearance also varies greatly from location to location. Here’s just a few examples of how much the species can vary;

1. North AmericaThe North American variety is larger and heavier then it’s European cousins. These foxes have long, incredibly soft fur, especially those living across their northern range. The colors are usually quite rich and even across the body, (sometimes referred to as cherry red), with a darker grey tail. Silver and cross varieties are also quite common in American foxes.


2. Great BritainThe British red fox is a smaller animal, which is just as happy in the middle of town as it is out in rural areas. The color is usually duller then the American variety, with plenty of frosting, (white hairs), over the back-end. The leg markings aren’t as pronounced as on some other types, and they often have black, rather then white tail tips. Even in winter, the fur doesn’t get anything like as long as on those foxes from more northerly areas.  


3. Continental EuropeEssentially the same as the British variety, with a few minor differences, such as the spacing of the teeth. European foxes often sport a lot of grey in their coats, (I actually refer to this color as European grey, as it’s so common here!) Yellow coloration is also quite common in these foxes. The fur on European foxes has a much courser texture then that of the American variety.


4. ScandinaviaAnother European form, foxes from Scandinavia have much longer, thicker coats to help them cope with the harsher winters. In color, the body and tail are a pale cream, with a ginger face and legs. This coloration is also quite common in Italian foxes, and foxes from arctic areas such as Alaska.


5. Arabian PeninsulaArabian foxes are desert-dwellers, meaning they require a very short, close coat, and extremely large ears to help them keep cool in the heat. The coat is a sandy color to help them blend into their desert home.


6. IndiaThe Indian red fox is often better known as the white-footed or desert fox. This is a very small sub-species, which isn’t dissimilar to the Arabian fox, sporting a short, sandy-colored coat. 


7. RussiaRussian foxes often have a very warm and even-colored red coats, with super-thick fur to protect them during the harsh Siberian winters. 


8. JapanRed foxes from Japan are quite dull-colored animals, and usually lack the dark leg-markings typical in many other types. I believe the Chinese variety is also very similar in appearance

This is only a small selection of the variety that exists within red foxes. Even within individual countries there tends to be a fair bit of variation between foxes from specific areas. Wikipedia has a good section describing many of these varieties and sub-species. 
Photos by Vic Sharratt and Bertie Gregory, (top row) || Menno Schaefer and Martin Garner (second row) || Dave Clark and Nancy Bell (third row) || Igor Shpilenok and nike.cocolog-nifty.com,(bottom row)
theurbanfoxwatcher:

Red Foxes Across The World
Red foxes are the most successful carnivores on earth, and have managed to colonize most of the worlds continents. From arctic tundra to deserts, mountains to urban streets, the red fox is able to adapt to live in any conditions, and it’s this, along with their adaptable diet and high intelligence, is what makes them so successful.
Because of the range of environments they inhabit, their size, anatomy and appearance also varies greatly from location to location. Here’s just a few examples of how much the species can vary;

1. North AmericaThe North American variety is larger and heavier then it’s European cousins. These foxes have long, incredibly soft fur, especially those living across their northern range. The colors are usually quite rich and even across the body, (sometimes referred to as cherry red), with a darker grey tail. Silver and cross varieties are also quite common in American foxes.


2. Great BritainThe British red fox is a smaller animal, which is just as happy in the middle of town as it is out in rural areas. The color is usually duller then the American variety, with plenty of frosting, (white hairs), over the back-end. The leg markings aren’t as pronounced as on some other types, and they often have black, rather then white tail tips. Even in winter, the fur doesn’t get anything like as long as on those foxes from more northerly areas.  


3. Continental EuropeEssentially the same as the British variety, with a few minor differences, such as the spacing of the teeth. European foxes often sport a lot of grey in their coats, (I actually refer to this color as European grey, as it’s so common here!) Yellow coloration is also quite common in these foxes. The fur on European foxes has a much courser texture then that of the American variety.


4. ScandinaviaAnother European form, foxes from Scandinavia have much longer, thicker coats to help them cope with the harsher winters. In color, the body and tail are a pale cream, with a ginger face and legs. This coloration is also quite common in Italian foxes, and foxes from arctic areas such as Alaska.


5. Arabian PeninsulaArabian foxes are desert-dwellers, meaning they require a very short, close coat, and extremely large ears to help them keep cool in the heat. The coat is a sandy color to help them blend into their desert home.


6. IndiaThe Indian red fox is often better known as the white-footed or desert fox. This is a very small sub-species, which isn’t dissimilar to the Arabian fox, sporting a short, sandy-colored coat. 


7. RussiaRussian foxes often have a very warm and even-colored red coats, with super-thick fur to protect them during the harsh Siberian winters. 


8. JapanRed foxes from Japan are quite dull-colored animals, and usually lack the dark leg-markings typical in many other types. I believe the Chinese variety is also very similar in appearance

This is only a small selection of the variety that exists within red foxes. Even within individual countries there tends to be a fair bit of variation between foxes from specific areas. Wikipedia has a good section describing many of these varieties and sub-species. 
Photos by Vic Sharratt and Bertie Gregory, (top row) || Menno Schaefer and Martin Garner (second row) || Dave Clark and Nancy Bell (third row) || Igor Shpilenok and nike.cocolog-nifty.com,(bottom row)
theurbanfoxwatcher:

Red Foxes Across The World
Red foxes are the most successful carnivores on earth, and have managed to colonize most of the worlds continents. From arctic tundra to deserts, mountains to urban streets, the red fox is able to adapt to live in any conditions, and it’s this, along with their adaptable diet and high intelligence, is what makes them so successful.
Because of the range of environments they inhabit, their size, anatomy and appearance also varies greatly from location to location. Here’s just a few examples of how much the species can vary;

1. North AmericaThe North American variety is larger and heavier then it’s European cousins. These foxes have long, incredibly soft fur, especially those living across their northern range. The colors are usually quite rich and even across the body, (sometimes referred to as cherry red), with a darker grey tail. Silver and cross varieties are also quite common in American foxes.


2. Great BritainThe British red fox is a smaller animal, which is just as happy in the middle of town as it is out in rural areas. The color is usually duller then the American variety, with plenty of frosting, (white hairs), over the back-end. The leg markings aren’t as pronounced as on some other types, and they often have black, rather then white tail tips. Even in winter, the fur doesn’t get anything like as long as on those foxes from more northerly areas.  


3. Continental EuropeEssentially the same as the British variety, with a few minor differences, such as the spacing of the teeth. European foxes often sport a lot of grey in their coats, (I actually refer to this color as European grey, as it’s so common here!) Yellow coloration is also quite common in these foxes. The fur on European foxes has a much courser texture then that of the American variety.


4. ScandinaviaAnother European form, foxes from Scandinavia have much longer, thicker coats to help them cope with the harsher winters. In color, the body and tail are a pale cream, with a ginger face and legs. This coloration is also quite common in Italian foxes, and foxes from arctic areas such as Alaska.


5. Arabian PeninsulaArabian foxes are desert-dwellers, meaning they require a very short, close coat, and extremely large ears to help them keep cool in the heat. The coat is a sandy color to help them blend into their desert home.


6. IndiaThe Indian red fox is often better known as the white-footed or desert fox. This is a very small sub-species, which isn’t dissimilar to the Arabian fox, sporting a short, sandy-colored coat. 


7. RussiaRussian foxes often have a very warm and even-colored red coats, with super-thick fur to protect them during the harsh Siberian winters. 


8. JapanRed foxes from Japan are quite dull-colored animals, and usually lack the dark leg-markings typical in many other types. I believe the Chinese variety is also very similar in appearance

This is only a small selection of the variety that exists within red foxes. Even within individual countries there tends to be a fair bit of variation between foxes from specific areas. Wikipedia has a good section describing many of these varieties and sub-species. 
Photos by Vic Sharratt and Bertie Gregory, (top row) || Menno Schaefer and Martin Garner (second row) || Dave Clark and Nancy Bell (third row) || Igor Shpilenok and nike.cocolog-nifty.com,(bottom row)
theurbanfoxwatcher:

Red Foxes Across The World
Red foxes are the most successful carnivores on earth, and have managed to colonize most of the worlds continents. From arctic tundra to deserts, mountains to urban streets, the red fox is able to adapt to live in any conditions, and it’s this, along with their adaptable diet and high intelligence, is what makes them so successful.
Because of the range of environments they inhabit, their size, anatomy and appearance also varies greatly from location to location. Here’s just a few examples of how much the species can vary;

1. North AmericaThe North American variety is larger and heavier then it’s European cousins. These foxes have long, incredibly soft fur, especially those living across their northern range. The colors are usually quite rich and even across the body, (sometimes referred to as cherry red), with a darker grey tail. Silver and cross varieties are also quite common in American foxes.


2. Great BritainThe British red fox is a smaller animal, which is just as happy in the middle of town as it is out in rural areas. The color is usually duller then the American variety, with plenty of frosting, (white hairs), over the back-end. The leg markings aren’t as pronounced as on some other types, and they often have black, rather then white tail tips. Even in winter, the fur doesn’t get anything like as long as on those foxes from more northerly areas.  


3. Continental EuropeEssentially the same as the British variety, with a few minor differences, such as the spacing of the teeth. European foxes often sport a lot of grey in their coats, (I actually refer to this color as European grey, as it’s so common here!) Yellow coloration is also quite common in these foxes. The fur on European foxes has a much courser texture then that of the American variety.


4. ScandinaviaAnother European form, foxes from Scandinavia have much longer, thicker coats to help them cope with the harsher winters. In color, the body and tail are a pale cream, with a ginger face and legs. This coloration is also quite common in Italian foxes, and foxes from arctic areas such as Alaska.


5. Arabian PeninsulaArabian foxes are desert-dwellers, meaning they require a very short, close coat, and extremely large ears to help them keep cool in the heat. The coat is a sandy color to help them blend into their desert home.


6. IndiaThe Indian red fox is often better known as the white-footed or desert fox. This is a very small sub-species, which isn’t dissimilar to the Arabian fox, sporting a short, sandy-colored coat. 


7. RussiaRussian foxes often have a very warm and even-colored red coats, with super-thick fur to protect them during the harsh Siberian winters. 


8. JapanRed foxes from Japan are quite dull-colored animals, and usually lack the dark leg-markings typical in many other types. I believe the Chinese variety is also very similar in appearance

This is only a small selection of the variety that exists within red foxes. Even within individual countries there tends to be a fair bit of variation between foxes from specific areas. Wikipedia has a good section describing many of these varieties and sub-species. 
Photos by Vic Sharratt and Bertie Gregory, (top row) || Menno Schaefer and Martin Garner (second row) || Dave Clark and Nancy Bell (third row) || Igor Shpilenok and nike.cocolog-nifty.com,(bottom row)
theurbanfoxwatcher:

Red Foxes Across The World
Red foxes are the most successful carnivores on earth, and have managed to colonize most of the worlds continents. From arctic tundra to deserts, mountains to urban streets, the red fox is able to adapt to live in any conditions, and it’s this, along with their adaptable diet and high intelligence, is what makes them so successful.
Because of the range of environments they inhabit, their size, anatomy and appearance also varies greatly from location to location. Here’s just a few examples of how much the species can vary;

1. North AmericaThe North American variety is larger and heavier then it’s European cousins. These foxes have long, incredibly soft fur, especially those living across their northern range. The colors are usually quite rich and even across the body, (sometimes referred to as cherry red), with a darker grey tail. Silver and cross varieties are also quite common in American foxes.


2. Great BritainThe British red fox is a smaller animal, which is just as happy in the middle of town as it is out in rural areas. The color is usually duller then the American variety, with plenty of frosting, (white hairs), over the back-end. The leg markings aren’t as pronounced as on some other types, and they often have black, rather then white tail tips. Even in winter, the fur doesn’t get anything like as long as on those foxes from more northerly areas.  


3. Continental EuropeEssentially the same as the British variety, with a few minor differences, such as the spacing of the teeth. European foxes often sport a lot of grey in their coats, (I actually refer to this color as European grey, as it’s so common here!) Yellow coloration is also quite common in these foxes. The fur on European foxes has a much courser texture then that of the American variety.


4. ScandinaviaAnother European form, foxes from Scandinavia have much longer, thicker coats to help them cope with the harsher winters. In color, the body and tail are a pale cream, with a ginger face and legs. This coloration is also quite common in Italian foxes, and foxes from arctic areas such as Alaska.


5. Arabian PeninsulaArabian foxes are desert-dwellers, meaning they require a very short, close coat, and extremely large ears to help them keep cool in the heat. The coat is a sandy color to help them blend into their desert home.


6. IndiaThe Indian red fox is often better known as the white-footed or desert fox. This is a very small sub-species, which isn’t dissimilar to the Arabian fox, sporting a short, sandy-colored coat. 


7. RussiaRussian foxes often have a very warm and even-colored red coats, with super-thick fur to protect them during the harsh Siberian winters. 


8. JapanRed foxes from Japan are quite dull-colored animals, and usually lack the dark leg-markings typical in many other types. I believe the Chinese variety is also very similar in appearance

This is only a small selection of the variety that exists within red foxes. Even within individual countries there tends to be a fair bit of variation between foxes from specific areas. Wikipedia has a good section describing many of these varieties and sub-species. 
Photos by Vic Sharratt and Bertie Gregory, (top row) || Menno Schaefer and Martin Garner (second row) || Dave Clark and Nancy Bell (third row) || Igor Shpilenok and nike.cocolog-nifty.com,(bottom row)
theurbanfoxwatcher:

Red Foxes Across The World
Red foxes are the most successful carnivores on earth, and have managed to colonize most of the worlds continents. From arctic tundra to deserts, mountains to urban streets, the red fox is able to adapt to live in any conditions, and it’s this, along with their adaptable diet and high intelligence, is what makes them so successful.
Because of the range of environments they inhabit, their size, anatomy and appearance also varies greatly from location to location. Here’s just a few examples of how much the species can vary;

1. North AmericaThe North American variety is larger and heavier then it’s European cousins. These foxes have long, incredibly soft fur, especially those living across their northern range. The colors are usually quite rich and even across the body, (sometimes referred to as cherry red), with a darker grey tail. Silver and cross varieties are also quite common in American foxes.


2. Great BritainThe British red fox is a smaller animal, which is just as happy in the middle of town as it is out in rural areas. The color is usually duller then the American variety, with plenty of frosting, (white hairs), over the back-end. The leg markings aren’t as pronounced as on some other types, and they often have black, rather then white tail tips. Even in winter, the fur doesn’t get anything like as long as on those foxes from more northerly areas.  


3. Continental EuropeEssentially the same as the British variety, with a few minor differences, such as the spacing of the teeth. European foxes often sport a lot of grey in their coats, (I actually refer to this color as European grey, as it’s so common here!) Yellow coloration is also quite common in these foxes. The fur on European foxes has a much courser texture then that of the American variety.


4. ScandinaviaAnother European form, foxes from Scandinavia have much longer, thicker coats to help them cope with the harsher winters. In color, the body and tail are a pale cream, with a ginger face and legs. This coloration is also quite common in Italian foxes, and foxes from arctic areas such as Alaska.


5. Arabian PeninsulaArabian foxes are desert-dwellers, meaning they require a very short, close coat, and extremely large ears to help them keep cool in the heat. The coat is a sandy color to help them blend into their desert home.


6. IndiaThe Indian red fox is often better known as the white-footed or desert fox. This is a very small sub-species, which isn’t dissimilar to the Arabian fox, sporting a short, sandy-colored coat. 


7. RussiaRussian foxes often have a very warm and even-colored red coats, with super-thick fur to protect them during the harsh Siberian winters. 


8. JapanRed foxes from Japan are quite dull-colored animals, and usually lack the dark leg-markings typical in many other types. I believe the Chinese variety is also very similar in appearance

This is only a small selection of the variety that exists within red foxes. Even within individual countries there tends to be a fair bit of variation between foxes from specific areas. Wikipedia has a good section describing many of these varieties and sub-species. 
Photos by Vic Sharratt and Bertie Gregory, (top row) || Menno Schaefer and Martin Garner (second row) || Dave Clark and Nancy Bell (third row) || Igor Shpilenok and nike.cocolog-nifty.com,(bottom row)
theurbanfoxwatcher:

Red Foxes Across The World
Red foxes are the most successful carnivores on earth, and have managed to colonize most of the worlds continents. From arctic tundra to deserts, mountains to urban streets, the red fox is able to adapt to live in any conditions, and it’s this, along with their adaptable diet and high intelligence, is what makes them so successful.
Because of the range of environments they inhabit, their size, anatomy and appearance also varies greatly from location to location. Here’s just a few examples of how much the species can vary;

1. North AmericaThe North American variety is larger and heavier then it’s European cousins. These foxes have long, incredibly soft fur, especially those living across their northern range. The colors are usually quite rich and even across the body, (sometimes referred to as cherry red), with a darker grey tail. Silver and cross varieties are also quite common in American foxes.


2. Great BritainThe British red fox is a smaller animal, which is just as happy in the middle of town as it is out in rural areas. The color is usually duller then the American variety, with plenty of frosting, (white hairs), over the back-end. The leg markings aren’t as pronounced as on some other types, and they often have black, rather then white tail tips. Even in winter, the fur doesn’t get anything like as long as on those foxes from more northerly areas.  


3. Continental EuropeEssentially the same as the British variety, with a few minor differences, such as the spacing of the teeth. European foxes often sport a lot of grey in their coats, (I actually refer to this color as European grey, as it’s so common here!) Yellow coloration is also quite common in these foxes. The fur on European foxes has a much courser texture then that of the American variety.


4. ScandinaviaAnother European form, foxes from Scandinavia have much longer, thicker coats to help them cope with the harsher winters. In color, the body and tail are a pale cream, with a ginger face and legs. This coloration is also quite common in Italian foxes, and foxes from arctic areas such as Alaska.


5. Arabian PeninsulaArabian foxes are desert-dwellers, meaning they require a very short, close coat, and extremely large ears to help them keep cool in the heat. The coat is a sandy color to help them blend into their desert home.


6. IndiaThe Indian red fox is often better known as the white-footed or desert fox. This is a very small sub-species, which isn’t dissimilar to the Arabian fox, sporting a short, sandy-colored coat. 


7. RussiaRussian foxes often have a very warm and even-colored red coats, with super-thick fur to protect them during the harsh Siberian winters. 


8. JapanRed foxes from Japan are quite dull-colored animals, and usually lack the dark leg-markings typical in many other types. I believe the Chinese variety is also very similar in appearance

This is only a small selection of the variety that exists within red foxes. Even within individual countries there tends to be a fair bit of variation between foxes from specific areas. Wikipedia has a good section describing many of these varieties and sub-species. 
Photos by Vic Sharratt and Bertie Gregory, (top row) || Menno Schaefer and Martin Garner (second row) || Dave Clark and Nancy Bell (third row) || Igor Shpilenok and nike.cocolog-nifty.com,(bottom row)

theurbanfoxwatcher:

Red Foxes Across The World

Red foxes are the most successful carnivores on earth, and have managed to colonize most of the worlds continents. From arctic tundra to deserts, mountains to urban streets, the red fox is able to adapt to live in any conditions, and it’s this, along with their adaptable diet and high intelligence, is what makes them so successful.

Because of the range of environments they inhabit, their size, anatomy and appearance also varies greatly from location to location. Here’s just a few examples of how much the species can vary;

1. North America
The North American variety is larger and heavier then it’s European cousins. These foxes have long, incredibly soft fur, especially those living across their northern range. The colors are usually quite rich and even across the body, (sometimes referred to as cherry red), with a darker grey tail. Silver and cross varieties are also quite common in American foxes.
2. Great Britain
The British red fox is a smaller animal, which is just as happy in the middle of town as it is out in rural areas. The color is usually duller then the American variety, with plenty of frosting, (white hairs), over the back-end. The leg markings aren’t as pronounced as on some other types, and they often have black, rather then white tail tips. Even in winter, the fur doesn’t get anything like as long as on those foxes from more northerly areas.
3. Continental Europe
Essentially the same as the British variety, with a few minor differences, such as the spacing of the teeth. European foxes often sport a lot of grey in their coats, (I actually refer to this color as European grey, as it’s so common here!) Yellow coloration is also quite common in these foxes. The fur on European foxes has a much courser texture then that of the American variety.
4. Scandinavia
Another European form, foxes from Scandinavia have much longer, thicker coats to help them cope with the harsher winters. In color, the body and tail are a pale cream, with a ginger face and legs. This coloration is also quite common in Italian foxes, and foxes from arctic areas such as Alaska.
5. Arabian Peninsula
Arabian foxes are desert-dwellers, meaning they require a very short, close coat, and extremely large ears to help them keep cool in the heat. The coat is a sandy color to help them blend into their desert home.
6. India
The Indian red fox is often better known as the white-footed or desert fox. This is a very small sub-species, which isn’t dissimilar to the Arabian fox, sporting a short, sandy-colored coat.
7. Russia
Russian foxes often have a very warm and even-colored red coats, with super-thick fur to protect them during the harsh Siberian winters.
8. Japan
Red foxes from Japan are quite dull-colored animals, and usually lack the dark leg-markings typical in many other types. I believe the Chinese variety is also very similar in appearance

This is only a small selection of the variety that exists within red foxes. Even within individual countries there tends to be a fair bit of variation between foxes from specific areas. Wikipedia has a good section describing many of these varieties and sub-species. 

Photos by Vic Sharratt and Bertie Gregory, (top row) || Menno Schaefer and Martin Garner (second row) || Dave Clark and Nancy Bell (third row) || Igor Shpilenok and nike.cocolog-nifty.com,(bottom row)

theblackamericanprincess:

diasporadash:

theatlantic:

Why Teachers of Color Quit

Low pay and high stress drive black and Latino teachers to leave the profession at higher rates than their white peers.

Read more. [Image: J Pat Carter/AP Photo]

Yet still, many teachers seemed indifferent to discussing these issues at all. When Teach for America organized diversity sessions, many teachers in the corps would skip the sessions or come back telling me, “I am so sick of being forced to talk about this.” In one diversity session, so many teachers walked out in the middle of the meeting that corps members all received an email from the Teach for America Bay Area Director asking why so many people had left. A white teacher told me, “All those sessions do is make us all feel uncomfortable.” As a person who had spent a large part of my life as a person of color in predominantly white, upper-class spaces feeling uncomfortable, I felt frustrated that other Teach for America teachers did not want to tolerate just a few hours of this discomfort trying to discuss issues that could help the population their position focused on serving.

One night, I shared a drink with a fellow Teach for America teacher in the Mission neighborhood of San Francisco, an area historically with a mostly Latino, lower-income population. Upon learning that I lived in this neighborhood, the teacher told me, “Man, I feel sorry for you. I could never live in such a dirty place. I couldn’t even stand the buses around here. I took a taxi.” It shocked me that a person teaching students from neighborhoods so similar to the Mission could so easily dismiss it. It shocked me even more when this same person was later chosen to give a speech at an educational fundraiser about his success as a teacher. I have no doubt that he was effective in the classroom in several ways. But yet I had to wonder how he could truly help our students when he could so easily show disdain for the places they came from.”  

white saviorism negatively impacts students, fellow teachers, education as a whole.

Racists

Anonymous Asked
Questionlike your cartoon pic, where did you find that pic Answer

Subtitled screen shot = cartoon ?

It’s a screen shot from a french film called masculine feminine
I think that’s the one